MUNICH ART ADVENTURE {5}

The reason I wanted to go to the Lenbachhaus was because of: Der Blaue Reiter (The Blue Rider)

Der Blaue Reiter was the name of a group of artists in Munich (1911-1914) who practiced expressionism. Artists included Wassily Kandinsky, Alexei von Jawlensky, Marianne von Werefkin, Franz Marc, August Macke and Gabriele Münter.

Honestly, all I wanted was to go into a room and be surrounded by Franz Marc's colorful and beautiful horses. I had seen a postcard years ago and his images don't seem to leave my mind. Art can do that to you.

 

When you enter the museum, you're greeted by this impressive vortex sculpture by Olafur Eliasson (Wirbelwerk).

Franz Marc's Blaues Pferd I

Franz Marc's Blaues Pferd I

My family and I went straight to the top floor to go to the Blaue Reiter collection and to our surprise didn't see as many horses as we had hoped for.

Instead we saw the evolution of a group's work, which was interesting in itself. 

One artist's work would have a different look over time and my kids would tell me which art speaks to them.  Max (16) would like a certain work of Kandinsky at one period and tell me which Kandinsky he hates and which he loves or he finds "sick" (that's "good" in teen speak!)

Checking out museums with kids is fun because they just tell it how they see it. Luisa (10) won't hide her love or adoration when she enters a room. You can tell right away if something has touched her heart and it shows. 

 

 

Liebe (Love) by Alexei Jawlensky

Liebe (Love) by Alexei Jawlensky

 

 

 

 

Max thought this one by Alexei Jawlensky was "sick" (excellent, good, awesome, whatever positive thing you want to call it).

One thing I like to see in a painting is an artist's passion. It can transcend time and jump from the canvas into your heart.

This quote below by Franz Marc explains his affinity to animals.

“People with their lack of piety, especially men, never touched my true feelings….But animals with their virginal sense of life awakened all that was good in me.”* Franz Marc

He painted his passion. And that's my takeaway from Lenbachhaus:

Do the world a favor, fill your canvas with things that move you. 

1.  An artist's passion for a subject matter can infect the viewer. Look at me! Although I have nothing to do with horses, I wanted to be in a room full of Marc's horses. Passion is contagious and uplifting!

2. Art can awaken something beautiful in us and can inspire our own creative desire.

Enjoy this sampler of the Lenbachhaus!

My wife and I, Hermann Tiebert

My wife and I, Hermann Tiebert

Portrait of Gabriele Münter, Wassily Kandinsky

Portrait of Gabriele Münter, Wassily Kandinsky

Country Boy from Tegernsee, August Macke

Country Boy from Tegernsee, August Macke

The Hunchback, Alexei von Jawlensky

The Hunchback, Alexei von Jawlensky

Rupprecht Geiger

Rupprecht Geiger

Rupprecht Geiger

Rupprecht Geiger

Rupprecht Geiger

Rupprecht Geiger

Bertolt Brecht by Rudolf Schlichter

Bertolt Brecht by Rudolf Schlichter

The Suicide, Helmut Kolle

The Suicide, Helmut Kolle

Portrait with Apples, August Macke

Portrait with Apples, August Macke

Portrait of the Painter Emilie Charmy, Pierre Paul Girieud

Portrait of the Painter Emilie Charmy, Pierre Paul Girieud

Portrait of the dancer Alexander Sacharoff, Alexei Jawlensky

Portrait of the dancer Alexander Sacharoff, Alexei Jawlensky

Self-portrait as a group portrait, Alfred Hawel

Self-portrait as a group portrait, Alfred Hawel

Kandinsky and Erma Bossi at the table, Gabriele Münter

Kandinsky and Erma Bossi at the table, Gabriele Münter

City of R, Paul Klee

City of R, Paul Klee

Jawlensky and Werefkin, Gabriele Münter

Jawlensky and Werefkin, Gabriele Münter

Nothing is so contagious as enthusiasm.
— Samuel Taylor Coleridge